7 things you should know:

If you have an animal emergency, contact your veterinarian or emergency veterinary clinic immediately.

If you suspect or know that your pet has eaten or been exposed to a toxic substance or product, contact your veterinarian, emergency veterinary clinic, or the ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center [888-426-4435] immediately (a fee may apply).

  1. Your vet’s emergency home phone number;  Dr Jordan 707-887-7295
  2. The local emergency clinic number;   Use whichever is the closest emergency clinic to you! PetCare is 2425 Mendocino Ave (Santa Rosa) 707-579-3900
  3. How to get to the emergency clinic;   ________________
  4. Poison Control number;  1-888-426-4435 for the ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center.
  5. How to perform basic CPR on your pet;
  6. How to stop bleeding/apply a basic pressure wrap;
  7. How to muzzle your pet (to keep an injured pet from biting you)

Keep emergency phone numbers in your cell phone and on the refrigerator and next to home phones so you can get them quickly when every second counts.

First Aid Tips:

What would you do if…

…your dog ate the bag of semi-sweet chocolate chips that was left out on the kitchen counter?

…your cat had a seizure right in front of you?

…your dog fell down the stairs and started limping?

…your cat was overheating on a hot summer day?

To avoid the feelings of panic that may accompany these situations, we recommend the following steps to better prepare you for a pet medical emergency. These links summarize the basics you need for giving first aid care to your pet – check them out now and plan ahead so you’ll be ready for common emergencies.


Always remember that any first aid administered to your pet should be followed by immediate veterinary care. First aid care is not a substitute for veterinary care, but it may save your pet’s life until it receives veterinary treatment.


First aid supplies
Our handy checklist tells you all the supplies you should have on hand for pet first aid. Print out a copy to use for shopping, and keep a copy on your refrigerator or next to the first aid kit for your family, for quick reference in emergencies.

How to handle an injured pet
Knowing how to comfort an injured pet can help minimize your pet’s anxiety and also protect you and your family from injury.

Basic pet first aid procedures
Read our simple instructions for providing emergency first aid if your pet is suffering from poisoning, seizures, broken bones, bleeding, burns, shock, heatstroke, choking or other urgent medical problems. Print out a copy to keep with your pet emergency kit.

First aid when traveling with your pet
A few simple steps can better prepare you to help your pet in first aid situations while you are traveling. Remember: pet medical emergencies don’t just happen at home.

Pets and disasters
Whether confronted by natural disasters such as hurricanes, or unexpected catastrophes such as a house fire, you need to be prepared to take care of your animals. A pre-determined disaster plan will help you remain calm and think clearly.

Additional pet first aid links

 

Know these 13 Emergencies  (and call for immediate veterinary care!)

  1. Severe bleeding or bleeding that doesn’t stop within 5 minutes
  2. Choking, difficulty breathing or nonstop coughing and gagging
  3. Bleeding from nose, mouth, rectum, coughing up blood, or blood in urine
  4. Inability to urinate or pass feces (stool), or obvious pain associated with urinating or passing stool
  5. Injuries to your pet’s eye(s)
  6. You suspect or know your pet has eaten something poisonous (such as antifreeze, xylitol, chocolate, rodent poison, etc.)
  7. Seizures and/or staggering
  8. Fractured bones, severe lameness or inability to move leg(s)
  9. Obvious signs of pain or extreme anxiety
  10. Heat stress or heatstroke
  11. Severe vomiting or diarrhea – more than 2 episodes in a 24-hour period, or either of these combined with obvious illness or any of the other problems listed here
  12. Refusal to drink for 24 hours or more
  13. Unconsciousness

The bottom line is that ANY concern about your pet’s health warrants, at minimum, a call to your veterinarian.